What Do Budget Cuts in Education Mean to Your Family?

The news just recently reported that there are a lot of budget cuts coming for the new school year. There are plans to lay off thousands of teachers, cancel summer school programs and after school programs and increase classroom size. Every parent that sends their child to public school should be very concerned. The U.S. in its current state is not up to par with education and making such drastic cuts can only be detrimental to future generations.

Once these budget cuts become effective parents should expect the drop out rate to climb. Programs that offer extra help to students who struggle in reading or math may soon be a thing of the past. This will put a lot of extra pressure on parents to compensate for the lack of support from the school system.

The US Secretary of Education, Arne Duncan, is urging schools and parents to do all they can to prevent these changes from occurring. The loss of many of these programs will have serious effects on the quality of the education our children will receive.

What can parents do? Now more than ever, parents must be involved in making sure their child can read before they begin school. Since reading is the backbone of all other learning, parents need to be encouraged to invest some time in teaching their child to read before they even get to school. By sending a child to school that cannot read parents are gambling with their child’s future.

Studies show that a child that is struggling to read in the third grade never catches up to their peers. With less funding and less remedial reading programs, parents are left with no choice. It boils down to this, if you want your child to do well in public school and get a good education, get prepared to be involved.

Teaching a child to read is not a hard or complicated task for parents. A child learns to read much easier in a one on one setting, such as would be provided in their home, with the guidance of a loving parent. Many programs are available to guide parents in teaching their child to read.

Parents should certainly invest in one of these programs and begin teaching their child to read beginning around age 4. With an investment of just 15 minutes a day a child can learn to read well before the age of 5. The United States is facing an economic crises, which will affect those dependent on the public school systems. Parents would be wise to prepare their child for success by assuring they can read well.